Sunday, 27 January 2008

First Car Buying Tips

I don't know about you, but when I bought my first car I didn't have a lot of information to go on for the process. I admit I had two cars previously to the first car I bought, but those deals were made by my father. He was the man with the money and he was paying for the cars outright. So when I decided to trade in my car for a different model and a newer vehicle I needed a little help from those who had bought cars before. I didn't want to make a mistake and get an unfair deal from a dealership or private owner. The great thing was I had my parents to help me find the information I needed to purchase that car. I even had my mom come help me make the deal. It took us a little over five hours and closing the joint, but I walked away with one of the best deals on a 2000 vehicle that I could have for my financial state as well as my credit history.

Car Buying Tips

What you need to know about buying your first car is quite simple. First you need to know all about the car you are interested in buying. You need to know what that car would cost new, what the used retail price is for a dealership as well as a private sale, and what condition the car is in. You also need to know if it has any bells and whistles added on to it as that will affect the price. Kelly Blue Book and other consumer reports will allow you to find out all of the information you need for a general search. Armed with this information you can negotiate a fair price. If you have a trade in you should also know the value on that for trading it in to a dealer as opposed to selling it privately.

You also need to know about your credit history. You need to know where your credit scores stand. You also want to know where you will stand regarding the dealership score. The look at your FICO score as well as a risk score that they calculate. They are basically looking to see if you can afford the car you are interested in buying. If you don't have a credit history that is very lengthy you can expect any car loan to be offered a little higher than seems fair. They are just trying to establish your risk and since you don't have much of a history they consider you more of a risk.

Once you know both the car facts and the financial situation you are in you are ready to deal. You let the dealerships know that you have done your homework. Also let them know you are willing to walk away if the deal isn't to your specifications, not there. There are several tactics they can use like saying, "We have to make some profit," or "I work on commissions." You have to be in control not the other way around.
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